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Rescued US climber undergoing treatment at Norvic

  

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Global rescue failed to manage a helicopter on Monday to rescue Prof. All.

THT ONLINE

"Prof. All's condition is out of danger now"

KATHMANDU: An American climber who was injured after falling into a crevasse at Camp 2 of Mt Himlung in Annapurna region has been airlifted to Kathmandu on Tuesday morning.

According to Sujan Bhattarai of Himalayan Ecstasy, local partner of the expedition, a private helicopter rescued Prof. John All who suffered serious injuries on his arms and ribs, along with internal bleeding.

“John is now undergoing treatment at Norvic International Hospital in Kathmandu,” he informed.

Prof. All's condition is out of danger now, Bhattarai quoted doctors as saying.

“He got his ribs fractured and arms dislocated in the mountaineering mishap. Also he has bruises in his stomach.”

Yesterday, Global Rescue had failed to manage a helicopter to rescue him who fell nearly 43 metres down into the crevasse at Camp 2 at an altitude of about 5,897 metres.

A five-member team of the American Climber Science Program (ACSP) expedition headed towards Mt Himlung, which is 7,126 metres tall, without Sherpas after cancelling their earlier scheduled attempt to scale Mt Lhotse in the wake of deadliest avalanche in the Khumbu icefall route in the Everest region on April 18.



UPDATE:

Meanwhile, issuing a statement from Boston, Global Rescue said it successfully rescued All.

He was reportedly conducting climate research in the Nepali mountain.

Global Rescue, a crisis response firm that provides medical and security evacuation services to corporations, governments and individuals, was alerted to his situation via satellite text message relayed over the internet.

Prof. All at Norvic Hospital in Kathmandu. Photo Courtesy: Sujan Bhattarai

The rescue operation was conducted by contracted rotary wing aircraft at an altitude of 19,700 feet (6,000 metres), the Global Rescue said.

The rescue operation was led from Global Rescue's operations centres in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Thailand.

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