Nepal | April 21, 2019

Where a girl’s indecisiveness rules

THT TALKIES

Himalayan News Service

Photo: Still image from film Love Sasha

Kathmandu

When it comes to a love story, it should arouse some sympathetic feelings for the characters and situations in the audience. However, Love Sasha does not make the audience feel so. Though there are emotional scenes, they lack the ‘emotional’ effect. In addition, the plotline is unnecessarily extended. The plot can be told in a few sentences. Inclusion of unnecessary dialogues and irrelevant people does not really appeal to the audience.

Keki Adhikari. Photo: Still image from film Love Sasha

Sasha (Keki Adhikari) has returned from Australia to marry. Though she has not met the man, she is looking for a ring for the man. A question immediately arises: “Why is a woman, who is educated and has returned from a foreign country, shown to be so stupid? Why is she in a rush to buy a wedding ring for a man who she hasn’t even met?” The story goes on to present the woman as an indecisive one. There is misrepresentation of the female character regarding her choices and decisions in the story.

Sasha, who is returning to her hometown Pokhara, asks for a lift from Pralhad aka Pearl (Karma) who has recently broken up with his girlfriend. While she is helping him come out from the split, both fall in love with each other. However, Sasha’s engagement is already fixed with Siddhartha (Asif Shah). Sasha’s internal conflict regarding her choice of life partner is what the story is all about. And the audience knows in advance who her choice but have to wait for her to reach her decision on the screen.

Unnecessary inclusion of a novel, its writer, a hotel and theatre, makes the audience very, very aware of the commercialisation motive of the people involved. Had more time been spent in presenting the narrative than creating situations for the ‘events’ and ‘people’, it would have been a better watch.

Adhikari, who tries to take the audience on an emotional trip, lacks the ability to do so. Karma, who has shown excellence in theatre, is just average here in the film. He is however able to present the passion of a photographer through his role. Shah expresses his character as a male chauvinist from his few scenes.

A few camera shots are blurred making one feel dizzy.

Not an emotionally well expressed love story.


A version of this article appears in print on January 14, 2017 of The Himalayan Times.


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