Nepal | April 25, 2019

Students encouraged to pursue technical education

Himalayan News Service

Kathmandu, June 28

The Ministry of Education today clarified that one of the major objectives of introducing grading system in the School Leaving Certificate examinations was to encourage students to pursue technical and vocational education.

Speaking at a programme organised by Education Journalists Network today, Hari Lamsal, spokesperson, MoE, said the ministry wanted students to pursue technical and vocational education as the country was in dire need of skilled human resources.

Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training is the institution where students can study technical and vocational subjects. CTEVT has also fixed criteria for enrollment of students in various technical and vocational programmes.

As per the criteria, students should score minimum 2 GPA and ‘C’ in English, maths and science. A total of 73,125 students have scored D+ in maths, while 142,705 students have scored D+ in English and 165,516 have scored D+ in science. These students are not eligible to study health programmes offered by CTEVT.

Meanwhile, the Office of the Controller of the Examinations has said students scoring D and E in maximum two subjects would be allowed to sit for chance exam.

Ramhari Lamichhane, member secretary of CTEVT, said they could adjust 20,000 students in diploma level and 25,000 students in technical SLC.

“Currently there is a misconception that only students with lower grades can pursue technical and vocational education. But students with higher grades can also enroll in programmes offered by CTEVT,” said Lamichhane.

Dinesh Chandra Thapaliya, former vice-chairperson, National Planning Commission, said the government’s investment in technical and vocational education was not enough. “It has failed to expand technical education across the country.”


A version of this article appears in print on June 29, 2016 of The Himalayan Times.


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