Nepal | May 23, 2019

Traffic police equipped with body-worn cameras

Himalayan News Service
Members of a special team of trained traffic police officers pose for a photograph as the team was announced by the Metropolitan Traffic Police Division on Sunday, April 10, 2016. The team will be mobilised to nab the traffic rule violators who flee after the offence. Photo: RSS

Members of a special team of trained traffic police officers pose for a photograph as the team was announced by the Metropolitan Traffic Police Division on Sunday, April 10, 2016. The team will be mobilised to nab the traffic rule violators who flee after the offence. Photo: RSS

Kathmandu, November 11

Traffic police have introduced the use of body-worn camera to make their activities more transparent.

The MTPD has provided each of the 34 traffic police units in the Kathmandu Valley with at least one body-worn camera, which it said will be used while conducting a breathalyser test on drivers.

In the process of going hi-tech, the Metropolitan Traffic Police Division has already brought into use breathalysers, CCTV, go-pro and dashboard cameras.

Body-worn cameras have been introduced in the wake of increased incidents of heated arguments between offending drivers and on-duty traffic cops. The digital witness of the wearable camera is expected to make both the police and citizens behave calmly.

SP Lokendra Malla, MTPD spokesperson, said the body-worn camera was introduced to ensure accountability of on-duty cops in discharging their duties as it could record both the audio and video data of all activities and conversation of police with drivers.

It is mandatory for all cops wearing the camera to activate it while frisking or interrogating a suspect and administering breathalyser on him/her to take the snaps and record the way they are dealing with each other.

“It is also expected to deter police officials from exercising unnecessary power and assisting the competent authority in initiating action against the guilty.

Alleged misconduct of police usually translate into public complaints and hence the use of wearable cameras will definitely make the cops more dutiful and sincere,” said SP Malla.

On-duty cops are not required to obtain consent from a driver in a public place or in a location where compromise on the person’s privacy is not expected.

The camera should be deactivated during non-enforcement activities and footage used for official purpose only.


A version of this article appears in print on November 12, 2016 of The Himalayan Times.


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