Nepal | April 10, 2020

Fear of waterborne diseases looms among Pokhara denizens

Himalayan News Service

Pokhara, August 9

Locals in Pokhara-Lekhnath Metropolitan City fear an outbreak of waterborne diseases after drinking water pipelines supplied polluted water in the metropolis over the last few days.

The local consumers in the metropolis are compelled to drink polluted water for want of other options.

Technician Dineshwor Prasad Yadav at Nepal Drinking Water Supply Corporation said the locals were compelled to drink polluted water after the available water resources, reservoirs, and pipelines got damaged due to frequent landslips and road expansion work.

Yadav said the water brought through 16 and 20 inch supply pipes without any testing was stored in various water tanks of the organisation in Bindabasini, Pokhara. “We were confused whether to supply the polluted water, but due to huge pressure from consumers, we were compelled to supply the same water,” he added. Yadav informed that the office did not have facility for purification of huge amounts of water except by using chlorine.

Meanwhile,  a team of the Western Regional Hotel Association, Pokhara, reached the Drinking Water Supply Corporation office today with a complaint about polluted water. Association Chairman Bikal Tulachan said the team reached the office demanding solution to the problems after they could not drink the polluted water. “There is a possibility of epidemic and we fear the outbreak of waterborne diseases,” he said, adding, “All locals cannot afford bottled water.

It is said that the corporation had given the responsibility for setting up drinking water treatment plant to JICA. It is also reported that construction of water tanks for the plant has been completed. Separate toilets for male and female, washing spot and crematorium have been constructed in Saidi Ghatta, Siding, Lumre, Ghalel, Kghorakomukh, Rivan to keep water resources of Mardi khola clean.

According to the corporation, the daily water demand of Pokhara is around 65 million litres.

 


A version of this article appears in print on August 10, 2017 of The Himalayan Times.


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