Nepal | October 16, 2019

Business leaders meet on climate change

AFP
A rainbow over the Ulu Baram rainforest in the Sarawak on the island of Borneo. Business leaders, academics and politicians are set to meet in the Danish capital Copenhagen to explore how industry can help fight against global warming. Source: AFP/File

A rainbow over the Ulu Baram rainforest in the Sarawak on the island of Borneo. Business leaders, academics and politicians are set to meet in the Danish capital Copenhagen to explore how industry can help fight against global warming. Source: AFP/File

COPENHAGEN: Business leaders, academics and politicians are set to meet in the Danish capital Copenhagen Sunday to explore how industry can help fight against global warming.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso and former US vice-president turned climate campaigner Al Gore will be among the delegates attending the World Business Summit on Climate Change.
Gore is scheduled to deliver the keynote speech at the conference at 1200 GMT.
Executives from some of the world’s leading companies such Intel Corporation, BP and Siemens will discuss ways companies can help reduce greenhouse gases without hampering economic growth.
The meeting also aims to encourage businesses to invest in green technology and promote more efficient use of energy resources.
Think tank Mandag Morgen, which is organising the conference, wants to raise awareness of environmental issues before the Danish capital hosts the UN’s Climate Change Conference later this year.
The UN hopes to approve a new global warming treaty for the period after 2012, when the Kyoto Protocol’s obligations to cut carbon emissions expire.
The European Union has already said it will slash emissions by 20 percent by 2020 and raise the target to 30 percent if others set similarly ambitious targets.
Former US president George W. Bush refused to sign up to the Kyoto treaty over fears it would harm his country’s economy.
But his successor, President Barack Obama, is taking a tougher stance on the environment.
Lawmakers in the US Congress opened the debate last week on a "clean energy" bill that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020 and create "green" jobs.


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