LETTERS: Foreign assistance

Although it has been more than two years since the massive earthquake shook central hilly region and the Kathmandu Valley on April 25 and May 12, 2015, leading to the collapse of several monuments of cultural, historical as well as religious importance in the Valley including Kasthamandap, nothing needful has been done in order to reconstruct them in their original shape and texture.

Of course preparation of reconstruction of the damaged monuments is going on, without any doubt, something serious has to be done when it comes to reviving it in a permanent way so that there won’t be any further destruction. Well the damaged monuments have not received proper attention of the government and the Department of Archeology for their revival. Instead of rebuilding them on its own resources the government has been looking for international cooperation to rebuild the historical and religious monuments built by our ancestors without outside assistance. It shows how much dependent we have now become on outside world over the years. The National Reconstruction Authority (NRA) should have allocated enough money for the reconstruction of these monuments without any delay and made architectural designs ready.

Does not the Department of Archeology have original designs of all the monuments in its archive? The more quickly we rebuild them the more money and time we can save and show the world that Nepali people are resilient to any kind of natural disasters, be it an earthquake, flood or landslide.

It is shameful to note that we are looking for foreign assistance simply to rebuild the damaged monuments built hundreds of years ago when foreigners had not started visiting Nepal as tourists or diplomats.

Pratik Shrestha, Buddhanagar

Violence

At least 71 persons and security personnel have been reportedly killed in the violence that has erupted in Rakhine State of Myanmar. It may be recalled that there had been infighting between the ethnic Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine State.

Going by history that will dig deep into the factors behind such conflict and infighting, it seems that Myanmar being a small nation has long been grappling with insurgents. Interestingly and geographically, Myanmar is home to the mixed culture originating from the neighboring countries.

The fact is that if the ruling regime is not perfect in doing its duty, then all hell will break loose. That is what has long been happening in Myanmar.

First of all, the people at the helm of affairs should be strong enough. Then the equal rules and regulations should be enacted in the best interests of the people. If the regime flunks something, then something will in turn flunk something else – in the process the chain reaction - domino effect - will keep on continuing. The international community and the UN should come forward and help Myanmar.

P. Senthil Saravana Durai, Mumbai