Kathmandu, April 24, 2006

King Gyanendra today announced the revival of the third House of Representative that was dissolved on May 8, 2002. Without mentioning any Article of the 1990 Constitution the King categorically said the country’s sovereignty, executive authority rests with the people and they have the rights to rule. The King said the meeting of the HoR would convene on April 28 at 1 pm at the Parliament House in Singha Durbar. “Realising people’s movement and seven-party alliance’s road map we have revived the HoR which would help resolve the national problems, including violence,” said the King in his brief address to the nation. “We have decided to revive the HoR which was dissolved on May 8, 2002 as per the recommendation of the then Prime Minister,” said the King. He has also called upon the seven-party alliance to contribute to achieve the goal of the multiparty democracy and prosperity and progress of the country and the people. The King, in his address, also expressed deep condolences to those who lost their lives and hoped speedy recovery of those wounded during the 19-day long people’s movement. He has hoped that the parliament would serve interest of the people and the nation. The then Prime minister Sher Bahadur Deuba had recommended dissolution of the third HoR after he realised that it would not further extend the state of emergency to quell the Maoists insurgency. Deuba announced election to new HoR to be held within six months but the King sacked him on October 4, 2002 on charges of being incapable to hold the elections within stipulated time. Deuba, after consulting the parliamentary parties, had recommended the King to defer the elections by 14 months.

Biggest media coverage since royal massacre

Kathmandu, April 24, 2006

“I feel a big change is likely to take place in Nepal,” Kiyoko Ogura, a Japanese journalist who is here to cover the people’s movement, told this scribe. Like her scores of foreign correspondents covering the movement have made hotels in Darbar Marg and Bouddha their home since April 6. The movement is getting the widest coverage since the royal massacre. Restricted vehicular movement and snapped mobile phone services have affected their working. Jyoti Malhotra, foreign editor, Star News said never in her journalism career has she faced a situation like this. “Danger lurks everywhere at times like this but even while covering insurgency in India, the government never stopped us from reporting,” he said. “This is a denial of fundamental rights to freedom of expression.” All the media and ambulances were denied curfew pass on Thursday. “Defying curfew speaks for the strength of the movement,” said Ogura, who has authored Kathmandu Spring: The People’s movement of 1990.