This must be the only republic where we hold endless discussions about ‘young versus old’ in politics and in business. What ails our youth in our politics today? Most of them must be anywhere between 30 and 60 something, yet they consider themselves the young torchbearers of the country. They are like proverbial kettles who call the marginally older pots black. In politics or in life, you do not ask your seniors to quit and pave the way for the youths. You need to earn your keep. Youths have to prove their worth just as Alex Tsipras of Greece or Justine Tradeau of Canada did; and relatively young Marco Rubio or Ted Cruz are struggling to do against 70-year-old Donald Trump for nomination as the Republican candidate. The story is the same in the Democratic Party nomination. A younger Hillary Clinton is trying hard to break the older wall of Bernie Sanders, who despite his age (74 years) and many grandchildren is tipping the scale in his favour, if his showing in Iowa and his lead in New Hampshire is anything to gauge by. Unlike in this country, it is clearly not age but the words flying out of their mouths that endear them to voters. It is only in this country where you can tell nonsensical jokes and still vie for the highest post. If age was the only factor, youthful Rahul Gandhi would have been the prime minister of India long ago. It is clearly not age but ideas and persona and presentation that carry weight in politics. Our youths must also remember that dabbling in politics right from their cradle or even school days is no guarantee that they will have enough credentials and qualifications to become prime ministers and presidents. Isn’t it mind-boggling that another outsider Donald Trump, who is a businessman and not a professional politician, is giving younger rival politicians, including Jeb Bush, whose father and brother were past presidents, a wild run for their money. Our youth must stop deluding themselves that they are the only natural political heirs. They must also stop imagining that they are the only ones who can transform the county. Older public servants and bureaucrats in India are lapped up by the burgeoning private businesses with promise of exalted ceremonial posts and lucre to sit on their board to give weighty credence to their outfits. In politics or in business, aged outsiders are preferred for their fresh ideas, enthusiasm, zeal and efforts. nomination as the Republican candidate. The story is the same in the Democratic Party nomination. A younger Hillary Clinton is trying hard to break the older wall of Bernie Sanders, who despite his age (74 years) and many grandchildren is tipping the scale in his favour, if his showing in Iowa and his lead in New Hampshire is anything to gauge by. Unlike in this country, it is clearly not age but the words flying out of their mouths that endear them to voters. It is only in this country where you can tell nonsensical jokes and still vie for the highest post. If age was the only factor, youthful Rahul Gandhi would have been the prime minister of India long ago. It is clearly not age but ideas and persona and presentation that carry weight in politics. Our youths must also remember that dabbling in politics right from their cradle or even school days is no guarantee that they will have enough credentials and qualifications to become prime ministers and presidents. Isn’t it mind-boggling that another outsider Donald Trump, who is a businessman and not a professional politician, is giving younger rival politicians, including Jeb Bush, whose father and brother were past presidents, a wild run for their money. Our youth must stop deluding themselves that they are the only natural political heirs. They must also stop imagining that they are the only ones who can transform the county. Older public servants and bureaucrats in India are lapped up by the burgeoning private businesses with promise of exalted ceremonial posts and lucre to sit on their board to give weighty credence to their outfits. In politics or in business, aged outsiders are preferred for their fresh ideas, enthusiasm, zeal and efforts.