Nepal | September 24, 2019

Nepal improves ranking in global corruption index

Himalayan News Service

Kathmandu, February 22

Nepal climbed up nine points in the Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index in 2017 compared to the previous year, ranking 122nd among 176 countries.

Previously, Nepal stood in the 131th position in the CPI. The CPI measures the extent of corruption within a country on a scale ranging from zero to 100. Countries securing higher scores are rated as the least corrupt and those with low scores are perceived to be the most corrupt.

According to the release, the survey conducted by CPI affiliated organisations had found that corruption in Nepal was still a major problem, especially in public institutions. The surveys also found bribery in entrepreneurship, abuse of public post and authority, lack of motioning and action, limited access of people to information and political corruption as major problems in Nepal.

As per the report, New Zealand is on top of the list with 89 marks followed Denmark with 88 marks in the CPI. Likewise, Somalia has been ranked the most corrupt country with nine marks.

In South Asia, Afghanistan is at the bottom of the list with just 15 marks. Afghanistan is ranked 177th out of 180 nations.

Bangladesh is ranked 146th, Pakistan 123rd, the Maldives 118th, Sri Lanka 97th, India 85th and Bhutan 29th.

On the occasion, former vice chair of TI Nepal Ananda Raj Mulmi said that the role of the civil society and the media was crucial in controlling corruption.

“Despite the improvement in ranking, the placement still indicates that corruption prevalence in Nepal is still worrisome,” stated the release issued by Transparency International Nepal.

Former chief of the Commission for the  Investigation of Abuse of Authority Surya Nath Upadhyay told The Himalayan Times that Nepal’s progress in the corruption index was the result of promulgation of the new constitution and holding of elections. “Now the challenge is to maintain good governance at all levels,” he added.


A version of this article appears in print on February 23, 2018 of The Himalayan Times.


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