• THT 10 years ago: Govt buildings set to harvest rainwater

Kathmandu, January 17, 2006

All the government buildings to be constructed in the country from now on will have rainwater harvesting technology. Addressing the closing session of a two-day national seminar on rainwater promotion programme today, Purna Kadariya, director general at the Department of Urban Development and Building Construction (DUDBC), said, “Our department is commited to harvest rainwater in all new government buildings.” The department is responsible for the construction of all the government buildings. It is going to construct a model of rainwater harvest in its own building. Nepal Water Supply Corporation has recently constructed a rainwater harvesting building in its Kamaladi branch. Government officials, policy makers and non-governmental organisations today made a joint commitment to promote rainwater harvesting technology in Nepal in the future. The participants admitted that the government has not been able to give adequate emphasis on forming a legal provision for making harvesting compulsory in new buildings. They urged the authorities concerned to take steps in this regard. Today, Ishwari Pokhrel, joint-secretary at the Ministry of Physical Planning and Works, Babu Ram Gautam, additional secretary at the Ministry of Local Development and Birendra Man Pradhan of Rainwater Harvesting Section at the Department of Water Supply and Sewerage presented their papers on rainwater harvesting.\

ADB readies to become company

Kathmandu, January 17, 2006

A cloud of uncertainty hovers over the future of Agriculture Development Bank (ADB) as it is in the process of being transformed from being a public organisation to a company, bringing it under the Bank and Financial Institution Ordinance from January 29. Speaking at a talk programme ‘ADB becomes a company: Opportunities and Challenges’, speakers underlined the need to widen its framework and adopt modern strategies to sustain the stiff competition commercial banks are facing today. Krishna Manandhar, deputy governor at Nepal Rastra Bank, said that the transition of ADB from a public organisation into a company is an opportunity to integrate its resources and mobilise them effectively. “Having the largest network is an asset for ADB. Remittance is supporting the economy. As foreign workers come mostly from rural parts of the country, ADB has an opportunity to outstrip other commercial banks as rural people would prefer services at their doorsteps,” said Manandhar. However, conforming to international norms of banking would be a challenge, he added. The competition it would face would fine-tune the management of ADB, said Radesh Pant, president, Nepal Bankers’ Association. The bank would need to work as a commercial bank.