Photo: THT

Photo: THT

Kathmandu

For many, monsoon is their favourite season. They find it beautiful and romantic. On the other hand, the continuous downpour is a nightmare for some. On a musical vein, the rains is also an inspiration for amazing pieces of music for many that soothes hearts and souls.

Drenched in tunes

We have the tradition of ropain (rice plantation) in the country during the monsoon season. Nepal is an agricultural country and people depend on the rains for rice plantation. However, working in the fields can become boring. So, what could be a better way than humming some tunes as you toil?

Photo: THT

Photo: THT

As a performer, Kamat likes to perform Desh and Tilak Kamod raagas and performs them regularly onstage. “I like all the raagas but I have a command on these two raagas. They are also popular raagas. It is more easy and fun to perform the raagas that you know very well,” he adds.

Moreover, monsoon raagas have been a base for many Hindi songs. Aawoge Jab Tum Sajna which is in Tilak Kamod is one of them, while Soona Soona of Sonu Nigam is based on Desh raaga.

Monsoon raagas are not only related to the rainy season with words but legends have it that Megh Malhar is ascribed to bring rain when it is performed. As per Kamat, it goes back to the palace of king Akbar. Tansen was one of the singers in his palace. The king loved the singer while others were jealous and planned to get rid of him. They went to the king and asked him to let Tansen sing Deepak raaga. The king agreed and ordered Tansen to perform the raaga. At first Tansen declined as the result would be bad, but he accepted the king’s order. As he sang, the temperature increased and his body was on fire. The heat soared so high that his daughter Swaraswati, who was in their house nearby felt it. She realised that her father was singing Deepak raaga and she started to sing Megh Malhar. It brought rain and her father was saved.